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Current Vacancies

Catalogue Data Assistant - Insects (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Nov 23, 2016.

The University Museum of Zoology has received a Designation Development Fund award from the Arts Council England for an exciting new project called 'The Beetle Voyage' that focuses on the Insect Collections of the Rev Leonard Jenyns (1800-1893) and his entomological notebooks, which record the biodiversity of Cambridgeshire during the early 19th century. We are looking for a Data Catalogue Assistant to work alongside the Museum Curators, Collections Manager and the Chief Technician (Insects) as well as internal and external experts to help identify and catalogue the specimens.

The candidate should have some knowledge of zoological terminology and an ability to transcribe data accurately, as well as being an excellent team player. As neither the specimens nor data from the notebooks are currently incorporated into a collections database, the role will also include uploading relevant information into the Museum's new collections database (EMu). To achieve this, experience of collections databases and particularly with EMu is an advantage.

Interviews will be held on Tuesday 20th December. If you have not heard from us by 20th December, your application will have been unsuccessful.

For an informal chat please contact Dr Edgar Turner (ect23@cam.ac.uk)

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for up to 15 months.

Once an offer of employment has been accepted, the successful candidate will be required to undergo a health assessment.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Please quote reference PF10836 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Postdoctoral Research Associate - Insect Ecology Group

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Nov 07, 2016.

We invite applications for a Postdoctoral Research Associate position in Dr Edgar Turner's Insect Ecology research group in the Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge. This position is funded for up to 9.94 months, up to 29 October 2017 (in the first instance) by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and should start on 1 January 2017 or thereafter. The position will be mostly based in central Cambridge, but will also involve fieldwork trips to Riau, Indonesia.

Specific goals of this position

The successful candidate will investigate the effects of the recent El Niño drought event in Southeast Asia on ecosystem processes. In particular, the project will consider the potential of different plantation management treatments to promote resistance and recovery of biodiversity and ecosystem processes. This will be done using existing and newly collected data from an ongoing experiment, the Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function in Tropical Agriculture (BEFTA) Project. The BEFTA Project is a long term, large scale, ecological experiment based in oil palm plantations in Riau, Indonesia (see Kurz et al 2016, Biotropica 48, pp. 483-490 and the project website www.oilpalmbiodiversity.com). The BEFTA Project involves a close collaboration between the oil palm industry (Sinar Mas Agro Resources and Technology Corporation Research Institute (SMARTRI)), the University of Southampton, Centre for Biological Sciences and the University of Cambridge, Department of Zoology, ensuring that results are disseminated to both the academic community and the oil palm industry.

Required skills and desirable experience for the position

Essential:

Completed (or imminently completed) PhD in an appropriate subject (e.g. tropical ecology, agricultural or environmental sciences);

Experience of analysing large datasets to answer ecological questions;

Knowledge of a programming language, such as R;

Experience of working in complex tropical ecosystems, preferably tropical agriculture;

Ambition and drive, strong work ethic and good interpersonal skills and a strong publication record;

Enthusiasm to interact with both academic and industry colleagues;

Ability to organise time and work effectively, independently and responsibly in a research team setting;

Willingness to conduct extended periods of fieldwork in Indonesia (several weeks, or months)

Desirable:

Experience of working within oil palm landscapes;

Experience of working with the agronomic industry;

Experience of insect identification.

Duties and responsibilities

Managing data collection at the field-site and liaising closely with project partner staff allocated to this project

Identifying and curating insect specimens collected as part of this project

Analysing and writing up the results

Contributing to planned knowledge-exchange activities

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for up to 9.94 months (until 29 October 2017) in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Please quote reference PF10670 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.

Research Associate - Global mangrove restoration mapping (Fixed Term)

From Jobs at the University of Cambridge. Published on Dec 02, 2016.

We invite applications for postdoctoral Research Associate position in the Department of Zoology based in the David Attenborough Building in Central Cambridge with Professor William Sutherland's research group and in collaboration with Dr Mark Spalding. It is funded for up to eighteen months, in the first instance, by The Nature Conservancy and should start on 1 February 2017 or thereafter.

Specific goals of this position

This research project will help to inform growing calls for habitat restoration as a means to undo past losses, to restore biodiversity and to re-build ecosystem service benefits. Mangroves are among the most valuable forests in the world in terms of their many important roles for people, but vast areas have been lost. This work will generate the first large scale maps indicating the potential for mangrove restoration world-wide. By linking such maps to models of benefits it will also support the prioritisation of restoration as a means to maximise gains for society. Detailed approaches will be determined as the project progresses, but it is likely that a sequence of methods will be identified. Maps of locations of recent mangrove loss will provide a baseline, these will be enhanced through efforts to map historical losses; to assess "restorability" linked to land-use and socio-economic drivers; and to consider ongoing threats, including sea-level rise and erosion. There may be merit in improving resolution for certain larger countries by connecting with national experts and locating national, high-resolution, datasets. Once developed these base maps of "restorability" will be linked to existing models of the ecosystem service value of mangroves, enabling the outputs to show not only where mangroves can be restored, but also the potential return on restoration investment from enhanced coastal protection, carbon storage and fish production. The work will be linked to, and informed by, policy experts as a means to ensure that it generates rapid and immediate impact in a world where restoration is increasingly being seen as a critical part of development and of climate change resilience and adaptation.

Required skills and desirable experience for the position

Essential:

PhD in an appropriate subject, completed or completion imminent (e.g. environmental-scale modelling and mapping, remote sensing);

Experience with Geographical Information Systems, R statistical software and modelling;

Ambition and drive, strong work ethic and good interpersonal skills and a good publication record;

Enthusiasm to interact with colleagues locally and internationally, and to build partnerships with new partners;

Ability to manage and analyse very large global datasets;

Ability to organise time and work effectively with a considerable degree of independence, but also in a research team setting;

Desirable:

Experience with remote sensing data;

Familiarity with mangrove ecosystems;

Ecosystem modelling;

Global scale data handling

Duties and responsibilities

Designing and carrying out an exercise to map the distribution of areas for the potential restoration of mangrove habitat at a global scale;

Overlay these maps with models of mangrove ecosystem service benefits to help quantify the spatial patterns in the potential value of mangrove restoration;

Analysing and writing up the results for publication.

Interviews in person or by Skype on or after 10 January

Fixed-term: The funds for this post are available for up to 18 months in the first instance.

To apply online for this vacancy, please click on the 'Apply' button below. This will route you to the University's Web Recruitment System, where you will need to register an account (if you have not already) and log in before completing the online application form.

Please quote reference PF10869 on your application and in any correspondence about this vacancy.

The University values diversity and is committed to equality of opportunity.

The University has a responsibility to ensure that all employees are eligible to live and work in the UK.