skip to content

Department of Zoology

 
Subscribe to External Events of Interest feed
A list of external seminars and events potentially of interest to members of the Department of Zoology.
Updated: 1 hour 19 min ago

Fri 24 Jan 17:30: Mysteries of Modern Physics

Tue, 15/10/2019 - 07:31
Mysteries of Modern Physics

One of the great intellectual achievements of the twentieth century was the theory of quantum mechanics, according to which observational results can only be predicted probabilistically rather than with certainty. Yet, after decades in which the theory has been successfully used on an everyday basis, most physicists would agree that we still don’t truly understand what it means. I will talk about the source of this puzzlement, and explain why an increasing number of physicists are led to an apparently astonishing conclusion: that the world we experience is constantly branching into different versions, representing the different possible outcome of quantum measurements. This could have important consequences for quantum gravity and the emergence of spacetime.

Sean Carroll is a theoretical physicist at the California Institute of Technology, and an External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute. He is the host of the weekly Mindscape podcast. He is the author of several books, most recently Something Deeply Hidden: Quantum Worlds and the Emergence of Spacetime.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Fri 07 Feb 17:30: Alan Turing and the Enigma Machine

Mon, 14/10/2019 - 11:16
Alan Turing and the Enigma Machine

Alan Turing was one of our great 20th century mathematicians, and a pioneer of computer science. However, he may best be remembered as one of the leading code breakers of Bletchley Park during World War II. It was Turing’s brilliant insights and mathematical mind that helped to break Enigma, the apparently unbreakable code used by the German military. We present a history of both Alan Turing and the Enigma, leading up to this fascinating battle of man against machine – including a full demonstration of an original WWII Enigma Machine!

Dr James Grime is a mathematician and public speaker. James now runs The Enigma Project and travels the world giving public talks on the history and mathematics of codes and code breaking. James is also a presenter of the YouTube channel numberphile.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Wed 06 Nov 13:00: The Weddell Sea, Antarctica: modern science and the search for Shackleton’s Endurance

Thu, 10/10/2019 - 08:25
The Weddell Sea, Antarctica: modern science and the search for Shackleton’s Endurance

The primary aim of the Weddell Sea Expedition 2019 was to investigate the fluctuating extent and glacial history of the Larsen C Ice Shelf, together with the sea ice, oceanography and marine biology close to it, as part of an interdisciplinary science programme led by the Scott Polar Research Institute. The Weddell Sea and Larsen Ice Shelf were selected for investigation because of the known instability of ice shelves in this area, including the recent calving of the huge iceberg A68 , and the significance of the area for sea-ice and dense bottom-water formation. The expedition platform was the South African icebreaker Agulhas II, which was equipped with a number of scientific instruments including two state-of-the-art autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). The initial findings of the expedition, including geophysical observations of past ice-shelf grounding lines imaged in unprecedented detail, will be presented. A second expedition aim was to use the AUVs to search for the wreck of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s ship Endurance which was crushed by sea ice and sank in the Weddell Sea during the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition (1914 – 1917). A century later the sea-ice conditions in the western Weddell Sea remain just as challenging, but in early 2019 the Agulhas II managed to penetrate this remote region to search for the wreck, whose position was known from historical theodolite and sextant measurements held in the archives of the Scott Polar Research Institute. The search for Endurance will also be outlined.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Wed 20 Nov 13:00: The uses of messiness: understanding climate governance in practice

Mon, 30/09/2019 - 08:23
The uses of messiness: understanding climate governance in practice

Coordination, organisation, alignment, integration, multi-level governance, subsidiarity, coalition-making, harmonisation, orchestration: these are all different words which have become a standard part of the climate change governance vocabulary. They all have one thing in common: they represent attempts to introduce ‘order’ in governance institutions to facilitate the delivery of climate change policy. While the actual vocabularies to describe governance arrangements across spaces and scales have changed in the history of climate change policy, they have maintained a core idea: institutional ordering makes the climate change landscape governable. What if governing would require, instead, a deliberate engagement with messiness? In this lecture I will offer an initial exploration of the uses and risks of messiness as a form of climate change governance. My proposal emerges against the backdrop of multiple, overlapping proposals to deliver order as a priority response to the urgent challenge of climate change. Ordering is part of the collective quest to make sense of an indeterminate World. An engagement with on-the-ground contexts of action suggests that ordering efforts tend to be inadequate, incomplete, and often deviate attention from immediate priorities at hand. From the active designation of the pure and impure as a form of social regulation (cf. Douglas, 1956) to the fortress of consciousness that helps us to typify normality (cf. Foucault, 1961) ordering efforts are linked to multiple forms of conscious and unconscious oppression. Climate change imposes a different perspective. The scale of the challenge asks for acting without certainty, and for embracing hope and possibility as a means to reach more sustainable futures. My hypothesis is accepting messiness is a workable alternative for delivering realistic, on-the-ground climate change action with the potential to transform this world. Governance as messiness resonates with feminist alternatives to despair in the Anthropocene. In an urban context- the setting that my scholarship explores- embracing messiness requires: 1) a revisable approach to climate action strategies, 2) an openness to multiple forms of climate knowledge and the role of knowledge holders, and 3) a recognition of the body as a mediator of climate change action.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Wed 20 Nov 13:00: The uses of messiness: understanding climate governance in practice

Wed, 18/09/2019 - 08:23
The uses of messiness: understanding climate governance in practice

Coordination, organisation, alignment, integration, multi-level governance, subsidiarity, coalition-making, harmonisation, orchestration: these are all different words which have become a standard part of the climate change governance vocabulary. They all have one thing in common: they represent attempts to introduce ‘order’ in governance institutions to facilitate the delivery of climate change policy. While the actual vocabularies to describe governance arrangements across spaces and scales have changed in the history of climate change policy, they have maintained a core idea: institutional ordering makes the climate change landscape governable. What if governing would require, instead, a deliberate engagement with messiness? In this lecture I will offer an initial exploration of the uses and risks of messiness as a form of climate change governance. My proposal emerges against the backdrop of multiple, overlapping proposals to deliver order as a priority response to the urgent challenge of climate change. Ordering is part of the collective quest to make sense of an indeterminate World. An engagement with on-the-ground contexts of action suggests that ordering efforts tend to be inadequate, incomplete, and often deviate attention from immediate priorities at hand. From the active designation of the pure and impure as a form of social regulation (cf. Douglas, 1956) to the fortress of consciousness that helps us to typify normality (cf. Foucault, 1961) ordering efforts are linked to multiple forms of conscious and unconscious oppression. Climate change imposes a different perspective. The scale of the challenge asks for acting without certainty, and for embracing hope and possibility as a means to reach more sustainable futures. My hypothesis is accepting messiness is a workable alternative for delivering realistic, on-the-ground climate change action with the potential to transform this world. Governance as messiness resonates with feminist alternatives to despair in the Anthropocene. In an urban context- the setting that my scholarship explores- embracing messiness requires: 1) a revisable approach to climate action strategies, 2) an openness to multiple forms of climate knowledge and the role of knowledge holders, and 3) a recognition of the body as a mediator of climate change action.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 12 Nov 17:00: Geographies of Knowledge Annual Lecture: Configuring and Contesting Planetary Health: Knowledge Politics in Ecologies of Disease

Thu, 12/09/2019 - 15:48
Geographies of Knowledge Annual Lecture: Configuring and Contesting Planetary Health: Knowledge Politics in Ecologies of Disease

Contemporary imaginaries of ‘planetary health’ and ‘one health’ call upon new combinations of knowledge to address pressing global-scale predicaments. These configurations are illustrative of broader planetary imaginaries in the Anthropocene, yet are contested by knowledges from different times, places and scales. Focusing on ideas and actions around infectious diseases, their ecologies and socialities, and drawing on examples from the ethnography of zoonoses – diseases passed from animals to people – in West Africa, I address what anthropocenic reconfigurations are obscuring and marginalising – including creative ways that people interrelate with non-human natures in living and dealing with disease. I argue for an opening-up of planetary (health) imaginaries to greater appreciation of local socio-natures in all their diversity, and for a politicisation of our engagements with ecologies and non-human natures that better appreciates plurality and uncertainty.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 24 Oct 16:15: #AanaJaana [#ComingGoing]: Curating gendered digital lives in Delhi's urban peripheries

Tue, 27/08/2019 - 14:50
#AanaJaana [#ComingGoing]: Curating gendered digital lives in Delhi's urban peripheries

This paper presents a gendered perspective of Delhi’s urban future produced and curated by young women living in slum resettlement colonies in the city’s edge. Using the metaphor of #aanajaana [#ComingGoing] as a paradigm for postcolonial urbanism, this paper argues that their everyday mobility across the home and the city reflect the paradox of belonging and exclusion in a digital urban age. The paper captures the ambiguities and paradoxes of their lives – on the one hand living as second generation rural migrants forcefully evicted from the city slums in the 2000s and resettled in the peripheries. On the other hand, as millennials with increased access to mobile and communication technologies, these women are also riding the digital urban age with promises of their inclusion in the future city. Using a digital and participatory methodology of WhatsApp diary entries of multimedia content (audio recordings, photographs, videos and text messages by women), conversations between the women and researchers as well as observations of the dynamics within the WhatsApp group over a period of 6 months, I suggest that #AanaJaana highlights the inherent slow violence of living between physical and digital exclusions from the city. By digitally and visually curating women’s everyday stories, #aanajaana also turned into a hip-hop song written and performed by these women that drew attention to the attritional and invisible violence of their lives.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 24 Oct 16:15: #AanaJaana [#ComingGoing]: Curating gendered digital lives in Delhi's urban peripheries

Thu, 22/08/2019 - 09:11
#AanaJaana [#ComingGoing]: Curating gendered digital lives in Delhi's urban peripheries

This paper presents a gendered perspective of Delhi’s urban future produced and curated by young women living in slum resettlement colonies in the city’s edge. Using the metaphor of #aanajaana [#ComingGoing] as a paradigm for postcolonial urbanism, this paper argues that their everyday mobility across the home and the city reflect the paradox of belonging and exclusion in a digital urban age. The paper captures the ambiguities and paradoxes of their lives – on the one hand living as second generation rural migrants forcefully evicted from the city slums in the 2000s and resettled in the peripheries. On the other hand, as millennials with increased access to mobile and communication technologies, these women are also riding the digital urban age with promises of their inclusion in the future city. Using a digital and participatory methodology of WhatsApp diary entries of multimedia content (audio recordings, photographs, videos and text messages by women), conversations between the women and researchers as well as observations of the dynamics within the WhatsApp group over a period of 6 months, I suggest that #AanaJaana highlights the inherent slow violence of living between physical and digital exclusions from the city. By digitally and visually curating women’s everyday stories, #aanajaana also turned into a hip-hop song written and performed by these women that drew attention to the attritional and invisible violence of their lives.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 12 Nov 17:00: Geographies of Knowledge Annual Lecture: Configuring and contesting Planetary Health: Knowledge politics in ecologies of disease

Thu, 22/08/2019 - 09:10
Geographies of Knowledge Annual Lecture: Configuring and contesting Planetary Health: Knowledge politics in ecologies of disease

Contemporary imaginaries of ‘planetary health’ and ‘one health’ call upon new combinations of knowledge to address pressing global-scale predicaments. These configurations are illustrative of broader planetary imaginaries in the Anthropocene, yet are contested by knowledges from different times, places and scales. Focusing on ideas and actions around infectious diseases, their ecologies and socialities, and drawing on examples from the ethnography of zoonoses – diseases passed from animals to people – in West Africa, I address what anthropocenic reconfigurations are obscuring and marginalising – including creative ways that people interrelate with non-human natures in living and dealing with disease. I argue for an opening-up of planetary (health) imaginaries to greater appreciation of local socio-natures in all their diversity, and for a politicisation of our engagements with ecologies and non-human natures that better appreciates plurality and uncertainty.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Tue 12 Nov 17:00: ‘Geographies of Knowledge’ Annual Lecture: Configuring and contesting Planetary Health: Knowledge politics in ecologies of disease

Thu, 22/08/2019 - 08:52
‘Geographies of Knowledge’ Annual Lecture: Configuring and contesting Planetary Health: Knowledge politics in ecologies of disease

Contemporary imaginaries of ‘planetary health’ and ‘one health’ call upon new combinations of knowledge to address pressing global-scale predicaments. These configurations are illustrative of broader planetary imaginaries in the Anthropocene, yet are contested by knowledges from different times, places and scales. Focusing on ideas and actions around infectious diseases, their ecologies and socialities, and drawing on examples from the ethnography of zoonoses – diseases passed from animals to people – in West Africa, I address what anthropocenic reconfigurations are obscuring and marginalising – including creative ways that people interrelate with non-human natures in living and dealing with disease. I argue for an opening-up of planetary (health) imaginaries to greater appreciation of local socio-natures in all their diversity, and for a politicisation of our engagements with ecologies and non-human natures that better appreciates plurality and uncertainty.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Wed 26 Feb 13:00: Changing Geographies of Pharmacology

Tue, 13/08/2019 - 12:25
Changing Geographies of Pharmacology

Abstract not available

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Wed 20 Nov 13:00: 'Ordinary stories' of climate innovation

Tue, 13/08/2019 - 12:25
'Ordinary stories' of climate innovation

Abstract not available

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Wed 06 Nov 13:00: The Weddell Sea, Antarctica: Shackleton and modern science

Tue, 13/08/2019 - 12:25
The Weddell Sea, Antarctica: Shackleton and modern science

Abstract not available

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 24 Oct 16:15: #AANAJAANA [#COMINGGOING]: CURATING GENDERED DIGITAL LIVES IN DELHI’S URBAN PERIPHERIES

Tue, 13/08/2019 - 09:22
#AANAJAANA [#COMINGGOING]: CURATING GENDERED DIGITAL LIVES IN DELHI’S URBAN PERIPHERIES

This paper presents a gendered perspective of Delhi’s urban future produced and curated by young women living in slum resettlement colonies in the city’s edge. Using the metaphor of #aanajaana [#ComingGoing] as a paradigm for postcolonial urbanism, this paper argues that their everyday mobility across the home and the city reflect the paradox of belonging and exclusion in a digital urban age. The paper captures the ambiguities and paradoxes of their lives – on the one hand living as second generation rural migrants forcefully evicted from the city slums in the 2000s and resettled in the peripheries. On the other hand, as millennials with increased access to mobile and communication technologies, these women are also riding the digital urban age with promises of their inclusion in the future city. Using a digital and participatory methodology of WhatsApp diary entries of multimedia content (audio recordings, photographs, videos and text messages by women), conversations between the women and researchers as well as observations of the dynamics within the WhatsApp group over a period of 6 months, I suggest that #AanaJaana highlights the inherent slow violence of living between physical and digital exclusions from the city. By digitally and visually curating women’s everyday stories, #aanajaana also turned into a hip-hop song written and performed by these women that drew attention to the attritional and invisible violence of their lives.

Add to your calendar or Include in your list

Thu 13 Feb 16:15: TBC

Tue, 30/07/2019 - 08:54
TBC

Abstract not available

Add to your calendar or Include in your list