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Department of Zoology

 
Read more at: First opabiniid-like ‘weird wonders’ discovered from outside North America – in a sheep field in mid Wales

First opabiniid-like ‘weird wonders’ discovered from outside North America – in a sheep field in mid Wales

24 November 2022

A fossil species discovered in a new exceptional fossil deposit near Llandrindod Wells in mid-Wales, has been described by Dr Stephen Pates, Postdoctoral Fellow in the dept of Zoology, in collaboration with Dr Joseph Botting and Dr Lucy Muir, honorary research fellows at the museum of Wales, and Dr Joanna Wolfe, a...


Read more at: Planar cell polarity: intracellular asymmetry and supracellular gradients of Dachsous

Planar cell polarity: intracellular asymmetry and supracellular gradients of Dachsous

1 November 2022

This work documents one final step in a scientific journey of 60 years. It is exactly 60 years since I (Peter) first had the idea, when a graduate student playing in a sandbox on the 3rd floor of the Zoology Department, that planar polarity might depend on a gradient of some molecule. The hypothesis was that cells are...


Read more at: Learning about the first animals on Earth from life at the poles

Learning about the first animals on Earth from life at the poles

12 October 2022

Emily Mitchell from our Deeptime Ecology Group and a team from British Antarctic Survey have recently published a paper about the amazing survival strategies of polar marine creatures might help to explain how the first animals on earth could have evolved earlier than the oldest fossils suggest according to new research...


Read more at: Drought changes the smell of flowers affecting bee visits

Drought changes the smell of flowers affecting bee visits

8 August 2022

Pollination in a drier world: Even moderate drought alters floral scent Climate change is everyday more present and dramatic in our everyday life, and 2022 has been no exception: heatwaves, drought, floods. Climate change also affects animals and plants, but more importantly it can have dramatic impacts on species...


Read more at: A new systematic map explores the level of research on within-plantation management practices in oil palm.
Oil palm plantation with fruit cut down and on the floor

A new systematic map explores the level of research on within-plantation management practices in oil palm.

3 August 2022

Megan Popkin and other members of the Insect Ecology Group have just published a new systematic map investigating the level of research on within-plantation management practices in oil palm. The article particularly highlights which practices have been researched and/or experimentally tested, as well as research gaps. Each...


Read more at: Cooperation between humans and wild animals
honeyguide eating wax by Dominic Cram, dolphin and fisherman’s hands with net by Fábio Daura-Jorge

Cooperation between humans and wild animals

21 June 2022

Cooperation between humans and wild animals People cooperate with many species of animals, such as falcons and sheep-dogs, but most cases involve the human controlling the animal’s actions through domestication and captivity. Sometimes, people and wild animals cooperate without human control and to mutual benefit, but much...


Read more at: Intensive farming may actually reduce risk of pandemics
Piglets suckling

Intensive farming may actually reduce risk of pandemics

21 June 2022

Intensive farming may actually reduce risk of pandemics Scientists evaluated the evidence that intensive livestock farming is causing pandemics, with surprising results. They find that intensive livestock farming could actually reduce the risk of future pandemics, compared to non-intensive farming. In a paper, published...


Read more at: First animals developed complex ecosystems before the Cambrian explosion
A group of Ediacaran specimens of Fractofusus and Plumeropriscum from the “E” surface, Mistaken Point Ecological Reserve, Newfoundland, Canada.  Credit: Charlotte G. Kenchington

First animals developed complex ecosystems before the Cambrian explosion

16 May 2022

First animals developed complex ecosystems before the Cambrian explosion Metacommunity analysis suggests succession, not mass extinction, explains Ediacaran diversity drop Early animals formed complex ecological communities more than 550 million years ago, setting the evolutionary stage for the Cambrian explosion...


Read more at: Cambridge’s global reputation in Biological Sciences recognised in REF 2021
World map indicating places where research carried out by Cambridge University is having a positive impact

Cambridge’s global reputation in Biological Sciences recognised in REF 2021

11 May 2022

Cambridge’s global reputation in Biological Sciences recognised in REF 2021 The results from the latest Research Excellence Framework (REF) have highlighted the global impact of Cambridge’s research in the field of Biological Sciences. 96% of Cambridge’s overall submissions within the Biological Sciences Unit of Assessment...


Read more at: Pilkington Prize for Teaching awarded to Tim Weil
Dr Tim Weil in a green demonstrator's lab coat talking to year 12 students in the lab at an outreach event

Pilkington Prize for Teaching awarded to Tim Weil

15 March 2022

Congratulations to Tim Weil on the award of the Pilkington Prize for Teaching This prize recognises outstanding contributions to teaching and learning at Cambridge. Tim deserves to receive this award for his exceptional and sustained contribution to teaching. Tim is a natural communicator and has brought his unique blend...