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Department of Zoology

 

Biography

I am a Senior Research Associate and Project Lead for the Drosophila Connectomics group in the Department of Zoology at the University of Cambridge, since November 2016.

This project is a consortium of 2 groups in the UK (Cambridge, Oxford) and 2 in the US (Janelia Research Campus and University of Vermont) and funded by the Wellcome Trust. The Cambridge group is lead by Greg Jefferis and Matthias Landgraf. The project aims to describe the circuits involved in innate and learning olfactory behaviour using the first electron-microscopy whole adult brain dataset generated at Janelia Research Campus by Davi Bock.

I have been interested in pursuing neuroscience research since my undergraduate degree in Biology at the University of Lisbon, Portugal. After completing a MSc Neuroscience at UCL with Jon Clarke, using real-time imaging to analyse zebrafish neurulation, I moved to Cambridge for a PhD. Working in the lab of Pat Simpson, I focused on describing the pathways responsible for the patterning of thoracic bristles in different species of flies.

In 2011, looking to contribute to community resources, I started my first postdoc with the Virtual Fly Brain project (VFB) and later on, also joined FlyBase. Both projects are large research collaborations that collect and integrate Drosophila data (neuronal or genetic, respectively), making it available to the community via a web-based resource. I focused on image analysis and neuroanatomy curation, and in a collaboration with Greg Jefferis (MRC-LMB), developed the neuronal similarity algorithm NBLAST, now used by various groups. I am currently a Co-Investigator on VFB.

Publications

Key publications: 

 

Other publications: 
Senior Research Associate

Contact Details

Room 306, Austin Building
Department of Zoology
Downing Street
Cambridge, CB2 3EJ UK
01223 (3)34455

Affiliations

Person keywords: 
Neuroanatomy
Image Visualisation
Electon Microscopy
Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
computational neuroanatomy
Imaging technologies