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Department of Zoology

 

    My background is in medical research in Africa. I worked for 14 years as statistician in the Department of Pathology in Cambridge on the immunology and epidemiology Schistosomiasis in Kenya and Uganda, a joint project with the Kenyan Medical Research Institute and the Departments of Health in Kenya and Uganda. The chronic nature of this infection allows a window on the development of the immune response over a timespan of decades: we demonstrated that an effective TH2 (IgE) immune response appears to be host-age dependent and does not develop until after puberty.

    After that I worked for 15 years in nutrition research with the Medical Research Council’s International Nutrition Group.  The wide-ranging research of this group was largely conducted at a field station at Keneba in the Gambia.  Particular focuses were the interactions between iron, anaemia and infection, fetal and infant growth, early (nutritional) determinants of adult disease, the analysis of longitudinal growth and seasonality (and other cyclic) data and genetic and epigenetic associations.

    In both posts I provided statistical and data management support to the research team.  In Keneba I directed the development of a demographic surveillance system, the computerisation of the clinic and a DNA/biobank, all of which were integrated with one another and with data generated by the numerous research projects.

   I joined the Department of Zoology in Oct 2014.  Here I have been engaged in a number of projects including collating and cleaning up Major Colebrook-Robjent’s egg collection data and running the ringing and RFID-tagging of Great and Blue Tits at the Univserity’s field site in Madingley Wood.  For Madingley I have recently written and implemented a system for real-time capture and checking of bird-tagging data.  I also put my experience as a statistician to use in the analysis of numerous studies arising from these and other projects.

    My publications can be found on Google Scholar where (as of September 2020) my lifetime H-index is given as 57 (35 since 2015).

    I am an enthusiastic wildlife sound recordist and sit on the committee of Wildlife Sound Recording Society.  I also run courses on birdsong for the Wildlife Trust.  I enjoy weekly sessions at the Museum of Zoology as a Visitor Engagement Volunteer.

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01223 (3)31759

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